Tag Archives: stone sculpture

Nora Valdez in Maynard

Argentinian sculptor Nora Valdez is showing drawing and sculpture at the Maynard, Mass. public library now through the end of May. Valdez creates poignant images about immigration, diaspora, and the experience of dislocation and communication.

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Goddess, or Monster?

Sphinx

In ancient Greece, a Sphinx had a woman’s head; in Egypt, the creature is often androgynous, or male. The Great Sphinx of Giza, in Egypt, is one of the oldest sculptures in the world. It still generates mystery today because its human head has clearly been re-worked from a more ancient face.

In Greek mythology, Sphinx was the daughter of Typhon and Chimaera. She was said to have come from the most distant part of Ethiopia, and proposed her famous riddle (“What walks on four legs in childhood, two legs in adulthood, and three legs in old age?) as punishment to Thebans. Oedipus solved the riddle: “As a baby man crawls on all fours, as an adult he is two-footed, and as he grows old he gains a third foot in the form of a cane.” At this the Sphinx threw herself from the Acropolis.

A sphinx was often used on a grave marker or stelae of a young man, as in this headless Greek example from 530 BC in the Museum of Fine Arts.

#GoddessID

Tracking down ancient goddesses

Talakh

#GoddessID is where I’ll keep a repository of ancient goddesses in sculpture, like Talakh, a new one to me. Here’s a quote from the label of this relief sculpture, in the Worcester Museum of Art:

“This Nubian masterpiece depicts Prince Arikankharer in a triumphal scene….a winged goddess, incised with the name Talakh, hovers behind the prince and holds a long fan and a cudgel.” So it looks like Talakh helped the prince smite many enemies, like the one lying on the ground at his feet, a dog eating his face. Ouch.

Worcester Art Museum

Nora Valdez

ValdezNora Valdez contributes sculpture and little-seen drawings to “Close to Home” at the Duxbury Art Center Complex. Her poignant work explores the isolation of the immigrant experience–and her work is more apt now than ever. It’s refreshing to see Valdez’s work both inside and outside the museum–in the galleries and also in the permanent sculpture garden on the grounds.

There is a panel discussion this Sunday, November 19th, from 2-3:30pm at the Museum, featuring “Close to Home” curator Elizabeth Michelman.

http://www.artcomplex.org/

noravaldez.com